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Checkout Reliable Online Payment gateway for college By kabir khan

  in Business | Published 2015-03-25 02:39:20 | 63 Reads | Unrated

Summary

The ubiquity of Cash cards for both private and public transportation has led to businesses finding other uses for the card, such as for payment gateway for college in public parking facilities. Hong Kong is also seeking alternative uses for its Octopus transportation payments card, e.g., for food a nd sundries in transportation-adjacent shopping facilities.

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The homes in which Asian people live are, on average, extremely small by US standards. In Hong Kong the typical government-provided flat is a mere 300 square feet—and that flat may accommodate a family of three generations. Even when family income is sufficient to buy a PC, there is often no place at home to put one. Anyway, for obvious reasons, people don't spend much time in their homes. In Singapore, for example, many families take most of their meals in the public eating houses on the ground floors of their housing estates.

As a result of such living arrangements, ho

me PC penetration in parts of Asia is low , and Internet use is often more likely to occur in public places than in the home. About half of the people with Internet access in China, for example, log on from Internet cafes (a big business in Beijing!) or other public places—a factor believed likely to dampen prospects for online payment gateway for school purchasing. Even in Singapore, where 44% of the population has access to the Internet, only 16% of Internet users have conducted purchase transactions online. In the US, where almost two-thirds have access to the Internet, over 50% have transacted online (Cole et al, 2000).

The ease of access to most shopping facilities in compact Asian cities reduces the impact of the convenience afforded by Internet shopping. The lack of prior experience with traditional catalog shopping also makes online catalog shopping an unfamiliar proposition. Martin sons describe the case of Medco Lane, a Shanghai-based online retailer: the company was founded in 1996 as one of the first mail order businesses in China. Other structural dimensions contribute to low levels of online purchasing in Asia. By comparison to the US, credit cards are used much less in Asia In Hong Kong, for example, the generally poor consumer protection regime extends to credit cards: Many Hong Kong consumers are liable for the entire amount charged to a stolen credit card before it is reported—there is no $50 limit as in the US. (This is also the case in China.) In Hong Kong stores that accept credit cards, the buyer is often asked if she will pay by cash—even when the amount far exceeds what most American consumers would carry on their person.

 Daily cash withdrawal limits on Hong Kong ATMs are HK$20,000 (roughly US$2,500)—far higher than they are in the US. Ironically, for many small purchases, Asians are much more likely to use electronic payments than people in the US. Smart card use for public transportation is widespread in both Hong Kong and Singapore. In Singapore, "Cash cards" are used in all vehicles as part of the country's electronic road pricing scheme where readers mounted on road gantries automatically make deductions from the Cash card based on the time of day and traffic flow. The ubiquity of Cash cards for both private and public transportation has led to businesses finding other uses for the card, such as for payment gateway for college in public parking facilities. Hong Kong is also seeking alternative uses for its Octopus transportation payments card, e.g., for food and sundries in transportation-adjacent shopping facilities.

While consumption taxes are increasingly being levied in Asia (Australia and Singapore are two recent examples), electronic purchasing does not confer the same tax advantages that it does in the US. Both Australia and Singapore, for example, collect GST on Internet purchases from abroad over a certain amount, and, within Australia, all electronic purchases are subject to GST (Jordan, 2000). The costs of shipping to Asia from the US and within Asia are also much higher than within the US. Typically, shipping costs for consumer purchases from the US to Singapore add another 20% to 25% to the purchase cost. In Hong Kong, Internet purchases also have no tax advantages, but for a different reason: there is no sales tax on purchases in retail outlets.

 

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